OnePlus X 2

OnePlus X

Now this is a brand new smartphone that can merge glossy design alongside a effectivity as a method to no longer put you to shame […]

iPhone Error 53: Apple Wants a Monopoly on Repairs, Says iFixit 5

iPhone Error 53: Apple Wants a Monopoly on Repairs, Says iFixit

Home | Mobiles | Mobiles News iPhone Error 53: Apple Wants a Monopoly on Repairs, Says iFixit by Manish Singh , 9 February 2016 Apple is facing heat from furious customers over bricked iPhone models. For more than a year, the Cupertino-based company has been disabling iPhone models upon detecting an unauthorised or third-party service on the smartphone, specifically related to Touch ID or Apple Pay components. The company says it does so only to ensure that a user's security isn't compromised. But the issue goes far beyond that, says gadget-repair site iFixit, adding that Apple wants a monopoly on iPhone repairs by blocking third-party repair services.
Kyle Wiens, co-founder of iFixit, has refuted Apple's claim that the iPhone is only disabled when a third-party uses non-genuine parts as the replacement for various iPhone components. Talking to Gadgets 360, Wiens noted that the 'Error 53' issue occurs with genuine Apple parts as well.
“For the record, the iss..

Marvel Headphones 6

Marvel Headphones

Superhero pajamas are high quality and all. nonetheless principally, you merely gotta present your superhero chops in your equipment, too Marvel Headphones. Take Coloud’s line […]

Common Software Would Have Let FBI Unlock Shooter's iPhone 7

Common Software Would Have Let FBI Unlock Shooter’s iPhone

The county government that owned the iPhone in a high-profile legal battle between Apple and the Justice Department paid for but never installed a feature that would have allowed the FBI to easily and immediately unlock the phone as part of the terrorism investigation into the shootings that killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California.
If the technology, known as mobile device management, had been installed, San Bernardino officials would have been able to remotely unlock the iPhone for the FBI without the theatrics of a court battle that is now pitting digital privacy rights against national security concerns.
The service costs $4 per month per phone.
(Also see: Worldwide Protests Supporting Apple in Encryption Fight With FBI Planned By Internet Rights Group)

Instead, the only person who knew the unlocking passcode for the phone is the dead gunman, Syed Farook, who worked as an inspector in the county's public health department.
The iPhone assigned to Farook also lacked a Tou..

HearNotes WireFree 8

HearNotes WireFree

I’ve tried wi-fi earbuds earlier than they’re a anguish. They’re not really wi-fi; oh, they might connect with your gadget wirelessly, however the left and […]