Tag Archives: mobile

Forcite Alpine

The standard ski helmet is set to get an overhaul with the aid of Aussie -up Forcite with its Alpine shrewd helmet.

as an alternative than simply supplying security the Forcite Alpine wants to permit its wearer to film, communicate, monitor and share skiing and snowboarding experiences easily. that’s why this helmet is stuffed with tech.

At the front of the Alpine is a 1080p digicam competent of 120fps gradual-motion video pictures, there may be additionally a wind-resistant mic for sound. If it is darkish or foggy there are developed-in OLED fog lights both to help maintain you nontoxic and to support illuminate your video footage.

The helmet additionally comes with a 3D speaker system that enables the wearer to take and acquire mobile calls with no need their telephone to hand thanks to an accompanying smartphone app. And when you are no longer on the cell the speakers can move tune from your cell by way of Bluetooth 4.1. The helmet might also connect immediately to the web making use of its developed-in 50m Wi-Fi.

The Alpine points an inner Inertial measurement Unit, which is science-speak for action sensors. These enable the wearer to monitor speed, distance and altitude which may also be uploaded to the app for private records, to share with neighbors or as a competitive marker.

If all that tech sounds find it irresistible’ll hinder security, worry no longer. The Alpine can notice impacts and upon a serious one will send out a GPS signal to alert the snow park emergency workforce. All that and it will have to final up to 8-hours on a charge.

Forcite Alpine will come in 32GB, 64Gb and 128GB models. Pricing and unlock date have yet to be introduced but you’ll be competent to get maintain of 1 in late 2015.

Forcite Alpine

iPad mini: First look

iPad mini: First look

Apple’s iPad Mini will bring a lot more excitement and a little more confusion to the holiday shopping season.

It only takes a few minutes playing with the iPad mini to realize the scaled-down tablet computer will be a sure-fire hit with longtime Apple disciples and potential converts who’ve been looking for a more affordable entree into the mobile computing market.

With a 7.9-inch screen, the iPad mini is perfectly sized to be stuffed in Christmas stockings. Recipients who will discover the pleasure and convenience of being able to take pictures, surf the Web, watch video, read books and listen to music on an exquisitely designed device that’s pancake thin.

As enticing as that all sounds, the iPad mini also causes a dilemma, albeit a pleasant one.

The new option will make it even more difficult for holiday shoppers to figure out which mobile device to buy for their loved ones -or for themselves.

I felt the pangs of indecision within a few minutes of picking up the iPad mini for the first time.

As the company usually does at its product unveilings, Apple Inc. only provided reporters with limited, strictly supervised access to the iPad mini on Tuesday. That meant I could only experiment with it for about 15 minutes, but as an experienced user of the iPad 2, I could quickly see that the smaller tablet does just about everything its bigger brethren does.

Even though the mini’s screen is 1.8 inches smaller than the standard iPad, the movie “The Avengers” looked lush, even in a side-by-side comparison with the larger tablet. When I pulled up the latest issue of the New Yorker, I didn’t have to strain to see the text or pictures on the smaller screen. A quick check of other websites verified that the mini’s screen isn’t so tiny that it’s going to cause a lot of squinting. After I took a very crisp picture of another reporter testing out a mini, I decided to email it to her to test how easy it was to use the keyboard on the smaller screen. No problem there. Best of all, the iPad Mini can be held in one hand and is about half the weight of the larger iPad.

Apple-ipad-mini-review-635.jpg

The Mini worked so much like my standard iPad that it immediately caused me to have second thoughts about a decision I thought I had already made. I like my iPad 2 a lot, but it’s just too big to carry with me wherever I am. But there have been times I really wish I had it with me, like when I spot something that would make a great picture or when I’ve needed to check something on the Web. For various reasons, I didn’t want a smartphone that would require a data plan, so I had my mind set on buying the latest iPod Touch, which has an iPhone-size screen and superb camera.

Now, the iPad mini has me vacillating. Apple isn’t making it easier with its pricing strategy. The latest iPod Touch with 32 gigabytes sells for $299. An iPad Mini with 16 gigabytes of storage sells for $329. I’m tempted.

Like others who will no doubt be weighing the same decision, I’ll have to make up my mind. Do I want something that can fit in my one of pant pockets like the Touch? For starters, it comes in more colors than the black-or-white Mini and offers more storage capacity for a cheaper price.

Or do I want to pay a little more for another tablet computer that can slip into a coat pocket and offer a richer experience with a screen nearly two times larger than the new Touch?

The iPad mini is so mighty that I can’t believe the iPad 2 will be on the market too much longer. The iPad 2’s $399 price now looks like too much, given that the iPad mini can do just about everything it does on a slightly smaller screen. The iPad 2 still may have some appeal for people who want a larger tablet at a lower price the newest iPads, but I can’t see too many consumers buying Apple’s second-generation tablet now that the mini is available.

Consumers who aren’t set on buying one of Apple’s devices will have even more choices to make. The iPad mini is clearly aimed at siphoning sales away from the Nexus 7 tablet that Google Inc. began selling four months ago and the longer-established Kindle Fire from Amazon.com Inc. Figuring out which one is best-suited for you (or that special someone on your shopping list) will likely come down to weighing price against performance.

Amazon is sells a Kindle Fire HD with 16 gigabytes of storage and 7-inch screen for $199 and a similarly sized Nexus 7 goes for $249. That means an iPad mini will cost $80 to $130 more, a price that Apple believes is justified because it boasts more features, such as front and back cameras. The mini’s reliance on aluminum instead of plastic for its exterior also makes it look more stylish and more enjoyable to hold.

If the speculation on technology blogs pans out, Google might make things even more interesting and dizzying for holiday shoppers by introducing a $99 version of the Nexus 7 in the coming weeks.

 

Download the Gadgets 360 app for Android and iOS to stay up to date with the latest tech news, product reviews, and exclusive deals on the popular mobiles.

Original Article here

Samsung UE40H6400

Samsung UE40H6400

Some strong features are slightly undermined by annoying flaws

The UE40H6400 has all the right credentials to become a best-seller for Samsung. Set up right, its crispy Full HD pictures, rich colours, and punchy contrast look great with most types of content. The brand’s Smart Hub proposition remains strong, although some of the latest tweaks are less than compelling.

Casual gaming and social media feel crowbar’d in from the mobile playbook. With Sony stealing the performance high-ground with its W8 series (below), and Panasonic offering arguably the slickest Smart environment with Freetime, this set is up against serious competition. Overall though, it comes recommended with only minor caveats.

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Common Software Would Have Let FBI Unlock Shooter’s iPhone

Common Software Would Have Let FBI Unlock Shooter's iPhone

The county government that owned the iPhone in a high-profile legal battle between Apple and the Justice Department paid for but never installed a feature that would have allowed the FBI to easily and immediately unlock the phone as part of the terrorism investigation into the shootings that killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California.

If the technology, known as mobile device management, had been installed, San Bernardino officials would have been able to remotely unlock the iPhone for the FBI without the theatrics of a court battle that is now pitting digital privacy rights against national security concerns.

The service costs $4 per month per phone.

(Also see: Worldwide Protests Supporting Apple in Encryption Fight With FBI Planned By Internet Rights Group)

Instead, the only person who knew the unlocking passcode for the phone is the dead gunman, Syed Farook, who worked as an inspector in the county's public health department.

The iPhone assigned to Farook also lacked a Touch ID feature, meaning the FBI cannot use the dead gunman's thumbprint to unlock it now. The FBI found the phone in a car after the shootings.

A US magistrate last week ordered Apple to provide the FBI with highly specialized software that could be loaded onto the work-issued iPhone 5c used by Farook. He died with his wife in a gun battle with police after killing 14 people in December.

The software would help the FBI hack into the phone by bypassing a security time delay and feature that erases all data after 10 consecutive, unsuccessful attempts to guess the unlocking passcode. This would allow the FBI to use technology to rapidly and repeatedly test numbers in what's known as a brute force attack.

The FBI said it wants to determine whether Farook had used his phone to communicate with others about the attack.

Apple has said it will protest the ruling and has until Friday to intervene in court.

San Bernardino had an existing contract with a technology provider, MobileIron Inc., but did not install it on any inspectors' iPhones, county spokesman David Wert said. There is no countywide policy on the matter and departments make their own decisions, he said.

Wert disputed the value of the remote management technology because he said Farook – or any other county employee – could have removed it manually. That would have alerted county technology employees and led them to intervene.

In many offices and classrooms, officially issued smartphones include the installed management software. It can unlock the phone, delete all information in case of loss or theft, track the device's physical location, determine which apps are installed, check battery life and push software updates. The technology is intended to make such products more suitable in corporate environments, where tighter controls are important to protect company secrets.

"This is the business case" for mobile device management, said John Dickson, a principal at Denim Group Ltd., a security consultancy. "The organization simply has no control or influence or anything over the device unless they have some MDM authority. The ability to do remote air updates, the ability to do remote wipe, the ability to control certain settings. Those are the standard kinds of things you do in mobile device management."

Dickson said "the big question now going forward, it builds the case for, is why this guy would have an essentially uncontrolled device."

This is the first time since the county issued its first Blackberry device in 2003 that law enforcement has needed access to a locked county-owned phone, Wert said. Prosecutors said in court filings that the county gave its consent to search the device. County policy said digital devices can be searched at any time and Farook signed such an agreement.

Apple executives said Friday that the company had worked hard to help federal investigators get information off the locked iPhone, suggesting they use an iCloud workaround while the phone was connected to a familiar wireless network so that it would begin automatically backing up and provide access to data. The executives spoke on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing legal process.

The executives said Apple sent engineers to work with the FBI on the workaround but the effort ultimately failed. In the government's filing Friday, prosecutors said in a footnote that neither the county nor the FBI knew the password to the iCloud account and the county, in an effort to get access to information on the phone in the hours after the attack, reset the password remotely – thereby eliminating the possibility of that workaround being successful.

But if the county had installed the management device it had bought onto Farook's phone, none of these efforts would have been necessary.

Gartner Inc., a technology research firm, estimated that over 60 percent of large enterprises – meaning business, government and educational entities – used some kind of MDM software as of last year, though not necessarily on all company-owned devices. That percentage is likely higher now than when the research was done months ago, said Terrence Cosgrove, a research director with Gartner's mobile and client computing research group. Cosgrove said MDM adoption rates are generally higher among government users.

Many workers balk at the idea that the software can monitor and track their personal phones, said Alex Heid, chief research officer at the cybersecurity firm SecurityScorecard Inc. But if the company provides a phone, it's considered reasonable practice to use such software.

"If a company's assumption is that they might not be able to get back into a device one day then it's not really a company asset at that point, it's a gift," he said.

Download the Gadgets 360 app for Android and iOS to stay up to date with the latest tech news, product reviews, and exclusive deals on the popular mobiles.

Original NDTV Gadgets

Sunda Electronic

Sunda Electronic

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Sunda Electronic