Tag Archives: iPhone

iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus First Impressions

iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus First Impressions

Don’t let looks deceive you.

The new iPhones look the same as last year’s models on the outside. But changes on the inside matter, from camera improvements to new sensors that enable quicker access to tasks.

I had only about 90 minutes to try out the new Apple products unveiled Wednesday – not enough time, given that Apple Inc. has a larger iPad, a new Apple TV device and new software for the Apple Watch, alongside the new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. I wasn’t able to test the new iPhone cameras in natural settings, for instance, to say whether pictures are really better with 12 megapixels, instead of 8 megapixels in the previous iPhones.

(Also see: iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus With 3D Touch Display Launched)

But I was able to try 3D Touch, a new way to interact with the iPhone. You save a few taps by pressing and holding on an app icon to go directly to a particular function. Microsoft’s Windows phones let you create shortcuts as home screen icons, but few people have Windows phones. On iPhones, the 3D Touch feature isn’t about enabling new functions, but getting you there quicker.

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If you want to take a selfie, for instance, you currently have to launch the camera app and hit a corner button to switch to the front camera. If you were taking video before, you need to slide the camera to “Photo” first. With the new iPhones, just choose “Take Selfie” when you press down on the Camera app. The phone makes all the switches automatically.

With Maps, you can use 3D Touch to get directions home, find nearby businesses or message your location to a friend. With Mail, go directly to your inbox or create a new message. I used 3D Touch to quickly post a status update – “Hi” – on a test Facebook account.

From a message, you get a preview of a Web page by pressing on a Web link. Similarly, you get a map preview by pressing on an address. Press harder to switch to the browser or Maps app. A new iPhone software update adds a back button so you can jump right back to what you were doing, even in a different app.

As for the camera, selfie fans will appreciate having the phone’s display mimic a flash. It’s not a real flash like the main camera, but the display lights up briefly so that you can see faces in low-light settings.

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With a feature called Live Photos, the iPhone camera records an extra second or so before you take still shots so that images appear in motion. You need an iPhone, iPad or Mac with the latest software to view it, though, which could limit sharing with your Android and Windows family and friends.

Those expecting revolutionary changes will be disappointed, but the new iPhones have enough new features to consider buying over an older model. Of course, wait for a full test rather than just first impressions. The new phones aren’t coming out until September 25 anyway, although advance orders begin Saturday.

As for Apple’s other products:

iPad Pro (coming in November)
As someone who prefers an iPad mini over the full-size version, I’m probably not the right customer for an even larger iPad.

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But the iPad Pro does have promise for heavy-duty users, particularly if you pay $99 for a stylus and $169 for a physical keyboard cover, on top of the $799 starting price. The keyboard doesn’t feel as flimsy as ones for Microsoft’s Surface tablets, but you don’t get to change viewing angles as the Surface’s adjustable kickstands allow.

What I like most is the new stylus, known as Apple Pencil. That’s not an Apple Pen, mind you. The stylus does mimic a pencil when you try to draw on the iPad Pro’s screen. When you choose a black pencil, it comes out gray, like a real pencil. The line appears thicker when you press harder, and you can shade in areas by drawing with the Pencil lightly from an angle.

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Apple TV (coming in October)
Although Apple TV’s new app store will enable non-video apps, such as games and home automation, video will remain the centerpiece.

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The new remote shows a lot of promise, with a touchpad much like what’s found on laptops. You can fast forward through commercials more quickly, or even hit the microphone button and tell the Siri voice assistant to “fast forward five minutes.” And when you encounter dialogue that’s mumbled, just say, “What did she say?” Siri will rewind 15 seconds and temporarily turn on closed captioning.

New software (coming next Wednesday)
I’ve been using a preliminary, “beta” version of the new iPhone and iPad software, iOS 9, for more than a month. I particularly like that you can get transit directions on Apple Maps and scroll through photos more quickly. The font is bolder and easier to read. The update isn’t as huge as what you got in previous years, but I’m not complaining when it’s free.

Likewise, the Apple Watch’s software update will enable new types of third-party apps. It should address many of the watch’s current limitations, but it’ll take time to try out.

Download the Gadgets 360 app for Android and iOS to stay up to date with the latest tech news, product reviews, and exclusive deals on the popular mobiles.

Apple iPhone 6s

Apple iPhone 6s

4.0

  • Review
  • Key Specs
  • News
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Great design
  • Fantastic performance
  • 3D Touch enables new UI paradigms
  • Retina Flash on the front is great
  • Bad
  • Touch ID is too fast!
  • 16GB storage in base variant
  • Expensive
  • Battery life could be better

Read detailed Apple iPhone 6s review

Display

4.70-inch

Processor

A9

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

750×1334 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

iOS 9

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Battery capacity

1715mAh See full Apple iPhone 6s specifications

  • iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus Affected by ‘Stuck’ Battery Percentage Bar, Confirms Apple
  • Apple iPhone 6s Beats 2015’s Android Smartphones in New AnTuTu Benchmark
  • iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus Review
  • iPhone 6s and 6s Plus: Nothing Official About India Price Cuts and the Discounts May Not Last

More Apple mobiles BUY NOW Apple iPhone 6s Plus

Apple iPhone 6s Plus

4.5

  • Review
  • Key Specs
  • News
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Fantastic performance
  • 3D Touch enables new UI paradigms
  • Great camera including brilliant front flash
  • Good battery life
  • Bad
  • Ungainly
  • Touch ID is too fast!
  • 16GB storage in base variant
  • Expensive
  • More big-screen software features would be welcome

Read detailed Apple iPhone 6s Plus review

Display

5.50-inch

Processor

A9

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

1080×1920 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

iOS 9

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

12-megapixel

Battery capacity

2750mAh See full Apple iPhone 6s Plus specifications

  • iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus Affected by ‘Stuck’ Battery Percentage Bar, Confirms Apple
  • Apple iPhone 6s Beats 2015’s Android Smartphones in New AnTuTu Benchmark
  • iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus Review
  • iPhone 6s and 6s Plus: Nothing Official About India Price Cuts and the Discounts May Not Last

Original Article

The UNITEK 3-In-1 Connector will let you leave your laptop at home

UNITEK 3-In-1

The one thing that will weigh my bag down the most is my laptop. It is a monstrosity, but using a phone or tablet for work outside of the office just isn’t going to cut it. Opening up a laptop and setting to work anywhere is just too easy. You could make it work on your phone, but that would require opening an app, losing half of your screen to a keyboard, and you would have to use your fingers instead of a track pad or mouse, and that just doesn’t feel right.

If you like the portability of your phone, but wish you had the keyboard and mouse aspect of your laptop, then you might like having the UNITEK 3-In-1 Connector around. This is a smartphone stand that will allow you to connect three USB devices. There’s also a built-in SD card reader. The On-The-Go function will allow you to connect a flash drive, USB keyboard, or mouse to your phone.

This was meant for microUSB smartphones, but can charge your iPhone or tablet. It can act as a stand for smartphones up to 8”, and if it is not being used as a work station, this can charge three USB devices at once when plugged in. It’s plug-and-play, and supports Windows 7, 8, Vista, XP, 2000, Linux, and Mac. You will need to be near an outlet when using this $55 device. This is a great idea, but it comes with the annoyance of needing to find enough space to set everything up. You’ll have to balance out the ease of use versus the extra weight you’d have to carry with a laptop.

 

UNITEK 3-In-1

Facebook for iPhone a Resource Hog, Removal Boosts Battery Life: Report

Facebook for iPhone a Resource Hog, Removal Boosts Battery Life: Report

If you’re concerned about your iPhone’s battery life, you might want to consider uninstalling the Facebook app from it. Tests have found that removing Facebook’s iOS app can increase the battery life of an iPhone by about 15 percent. Additionally, getting rid of Facebook can also free up a lot of data on your iPhone, the test results indicate.

Facebook’s Android apps were recently found sipping up a substantial amount of battery life and other resources. And now it appears, Facebook’s iOS app is no better. The Guardian ran tests on an iPhone 6s Plus to find that removing Facebook’s marquee app improved battery life on the smartphone. Of course, this is not the first time that Facebook’s iOS app was found to be causing significant battery issues.

The publication claims that upon removal of the Facebook app, on average, it saw 15 percent more battery left at the end of each day of the test duration. Additionally, there were other visible benefits as well. The publication says that removing Facebook app freed up around 500MB (cache included) from the iPhone. This could be handy for users who’ve a iPhone with 8GB or 16GB of device storage.

The timing of the discovery couldn’t have been better, as only recently Facebook’s Android apps were also caught sipping up a lot of battery, for no apparent good reason. At the time, a Facebook spokesperson told Gadgets 360 that the social juggernaut was investigating the issue.

These conclusions are not isolated. Last year, AVG reported a number of apps that were negatively impacting the performance of an Android smartphone. The security firm found that Facebook’s app, which automatically starts running at startup, drained battery, bandwidth and other resources.

To recall, Facebook’s iOS app was found to have a bug last year. The bug was apparently causing a significant battery drain on iPhone. At the time, the company assured that it had resolved the bug.

The issue is also concerning because Facebook is one of the most widely used apps. The service, which is used by over 1.5 billion users worldwide every month, continues to be one of the most popular apps on both Android and iOS.

Download the Gadgets 360 app for Android and iOS to stay up to date with the latest tech news, product reviews, and exclusive deals on the popular mobiles.
Original Article

Panasonic’s Latest Smart Camera Bet

Panasonic’s Latest Smart Camera

Is it a phone-like camera, or camera-like phone? Panasonic’s Lumix CM1 has everyone confused including executives at the Osaka-based company.

While the gadget can make phone calls and has the size and screen of a smartphone, the answer lies in its Leica lens and a textured black body that is reminiscent of an old-school camera. This is a hybrid device for shooting photographs and video. And it’s one that has turned heads in the camera industry.

“When I talked about the product at a meeting of executives, they asked me over and over whether it’s a phone or a camera,” said Takuya Sugita, vice president of Panasonic’s AVC Networks Company, during a recent interview. “But this is a camera.”

The Lumix CM1 “communication camera” is Panasonic’s latest attempt to stave off the collapse of a non-professional digital camera market battered by the emergence of competitive camera functionality in smartphones.

The device comes equipped with an Android 4.4 smartphone operating system, a 2.3GHz quad-core CPU and a SIM-card slot. The 20 megapixel Leica lens and 1-inch image sensor give the CM1 the capability of capturing super high-definition 4K video images or crisp photographs of pollen specks on a flower, beyond the reach of the current generation of smartphones–the latest iPhone has an 8 megapixel lens.

Users can set aperture and shutter-speed settings just as they might on a single-lens reflex camera. They can also mount conversion lenses with macro, wide-angle or fish-eye specifications.

Panasonic is not alone in trying to find new products to breathe fresh life into the digital camera market. Sony Corp.’s6758.TO -3.25% QX range and, Nikon Corp.’s7731.TO -0.96% android-installed cameras spring to mind.

But at the recent Photokina photography trade show in Cologne, Germany, the CM1 won praise and an award for its surprising quality associated with much bigger dedicated cameras.

The device is packed with the latest communications wizardry for fast and simple uploading images to social networks or transfering photos via wifi.

“With telecommunications perfumes technology, we believe our consumer electronics products can deliver a lifestyle-changing experience to our customers,” Sugita said, noting that while Panasonic quit the consumer smartphone business last year, it has kept its tech specialists in place. “That’s why we have kept the team together even though we failed in the personal smartphone business.”

Sugita said the CM1 will be available in Germany and France in limited quantities later this year, but no decisions have been made on whether to make it available in other markets, including Japan, other parts of Asia or the U.S.

Panasonic’s Latest Smart Camera

 

Mimpi Dreams Review

Pleasant music, beautiful art, and engaging gameplay, make Mimpi Dreams, a puzzle platformer made by Silicon Jelly featuring a cute little dog as the protagonist, one of the nicer indie games that we’ve seen. It’s a sequel of iOS game Mimpi, and it tasks you with helping out princesses in distress. The entire game is set in the dreams of Mimpi, the dog protagonist. You’ll have to help the dog think its way out of several puzzles, which don’t necessarily adhere to real-world rules of physics. It’s all a dream and the goal of the game is perhaps to ensure that the dog wakes up happy, which was good enough for us to allow the developer some creative liberty.

With pleasant music playing in the background, we took up the task of helping Mimpi solve puzzles in the game. The basic gameplay mechanic is similar to most puzzle platformers. You can move Mimpi towards the left or the right – as with most side-scrollers – and the dog can jump over obstacles. There are five overarching stages, each with several rooms, each containing a puzzle you need to solve to remove obstacles and progress. One interesting detail is that the game seems to take place in one single day of Mimpi’s dream world. The first level takes place at dawn, then in the morning, noon, and dusk, and the last one at night.

Mimpi’s dream begins with a sobbing princess, whose sisters have been kidnapped. There is no dialogue in the game, which is understandable given that the dog may not necessarily speak English. Instead the game uses thought bubbles filled with images to convey the story. Mimpi Dreams starts with the dog aiming to be a hero and help the princess find her sisters.

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From there on, it’s a straightforward journey. Solve puzzles, get to the next room. Along the way you’ll find balloons that contain hints. You can only unlock hints if you collect bulbs along the way. Unlocking hints requires you to use one of the bulbs you collect. Hints take the fun out of playing the game though, because Mimpi Dreams is all about solving these puzzles. Generously placed checkpoints mean that you don’t lose your progress even if Mimpi dies. That means that the game’s only challenge is in its puzzles, which is why using hints is a bad idea, unless you just want to finish the game as soon as possible.

The only other challenge you can set yourself in Mimpi Dreams is collecting the juicy bones. This doesn’t affect the outcome of the game but some of these bones are in hard-to-reach places, which gives the game some replay value.

The game uses virtual buttons as controls. We aren’t huge fans of virtual buttons but they work well for this game since there are just three buttons – left, right, and jump. The buttons are big enough for everyone. The game doesn’t have too many jumps over obstacles, so the sensitivity of the controls doesn’t get tested much. We found the controls to be sensitive enough. The game lets you choose graphics settings, which is a neat addition that lets you save battery and run it easily on older iOS devices.

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We really enjoyed solving the game’s various puzzles, some of which were challenging enough to keep us busy for up to an hour. We also loved the game’s art. Some of the drawings are intricate and we found ourselves noticing interesting details in the background. These often contained solutions to puzzles, so the art is not just to make the game look beautiful.

We finished the game in play sessions spread across two days. The game has enough content to justify a purchase. If you are looking for a nice puzzle game with good music and beautiful art, we can wholeheartedly recommend Mimpi Dreams. The only complaint is that the game has tiny on-screen elements that make it tough to play on 4-inch iPhones. We enjoyed it on our iPhone 5s, but it’s best played on an iPad or a larger iPhone.

Pros

  • Beautiful art
  • Challenging puzzles

Cons

  • Game elements too small for 4-inch iPhones

Rating (out of 10): 7

Mimpi Dreams is currently available on the Czech Republic App Store. It’s due to launch on the India App Store soon.

 

Original Article