Tag Archives: gadgets

MimoPowerTube Star Wars V2

POWER OF THE FORCE.

Our smartphones are hungry little monkeys. But they work hard for us, so we keep feeding them. And because we need them to always be at the ready, it’s best if we keep a supply of their food on us at all times. So, if we have to do that, we’re gonna make sure it’s fun for us. Good thing the MimoPowerTube Power Banks exist. They are fun and power in one. And now they leap into a galaxy far, far away with the MimoPowerTube Star Wars V2!

Ok, so the MimoPowerTube Star Wars V2 power banks don’t do anything except power your smartphones, mp3 players, etc. BUT, they are available in Star Wars designs (like Darth Vader’s Lightsaber or Yoda), which means we instantly love them. About the same size as a C1 personal comlink, each of the MimoPowerTube – Star Wars Series power banks will boost the play time of your electricity-hungry devices. MimoPowerTube Star Wars V2 – may the Force of charging be with you.

MimoPowerTube

MimoPowerTube

 

Product Specifications  

  • Recharge your smartphones or other 5V devices with these fun, Star Wars-y, backup batteries
  • MimoPowerTubes recharge via USB
  • Choose from:
    • Boba Fett
    • Darth Vader’s Lightsaber
    • R2-D2
    • Yoda
  • Tech Specs:
    • Capacity: 2600mAh
    • Cell Type: Li-ion battery
    • Input: DC 5V 500mA
    • Output: DC 5V 800mA
    • Cycle Life: 500 times
    • DC Charging Time: 3-4 hours
  • Includes: MimoPowerTube, USB charging cable with multiple tips (microUSB, miniUSB, Nokia, Apple 30 pin, Apple Lightning), and a velvet carrying pouch
  • Dimensions: approx. 0.8″ diameter x 3.5″ tall

Free Apps With Ads Impact Smartphone Performance, Battery Life: Study

Free mobile apps with ads drain your smartphone’s battery faster, cause it to run slower, and use more network data, scientists, including one of Indian-origin, have found.

When compared to apps without ads, the researchers found that apps with ads use an average of 16 percent more energy than apps without ads.

That lowers the battery life of a smartphone from 2.5 to 2.1 hours on average – or down to 1.7 hours at the high end of energy usage.

 

Free Apps With Ads

Free Apps With Ads

Researchers at the University of Southern California, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and Queen’s University in Canada said that a phone’s Central Processing Unit (CPU) is like its brain – and ads eat up a lot of that brain power, slowing it down.

Apps with ads take up an average of 48 percent more CPU time – 22 percent more memory use and 56 percent greater CPU utilisation (the amount of time the CPU was used).

Since the ads themselves are content that has to be downloaded, apps with ads cause smartphones to use much more data – up to 100 percent more, in some cases.

On average, these apps use around 79 percent more network data.

Together, these frustrations and expenses led users to rate apps with ads lower – costing them an overall average of .003 stars on a five-star rating scale.

“In absolute terms, this is very low, but in the crowded and competitive world of apps it’s a huge difference. It can make the difference between your app getting downloaded or going unnoticed,” said William Halfond, co-corresponding author of the study at the University of Southern California.

 

Free Apps With Ads

Halfond along with Meiyappan Nagappan of RIT and other colleagues compared 21 top apps from the past year – culled from a list of 10,750 that had been in the top 400 of each of Google Play’s 30 categories from January to August of last year.

They then measured their effect on phones using analysis tools loaded onto aSamsung Galaxy S II smartphone.

Next, Halfond said he hopes to create models that will allow app developers to predict how well their products will be received by the public – both with and without ads.

iPhone 6C With 4-Inch Display Unlikely to Launch in 2015: Analyst

iPhone 6C – Apple may not debut its much-anticipated 4-inch iPhone model this year, while more details about the implementation of the expected Force Touch feature on the iPhone range have been tipped.

KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo contradicts recent rumours that suggested three new iPhone models were likely to launch this year – the iPhone 6S, iPhone 6S Plus, and iPhone 6C.

Kuo further added that the next-generation iPhone models featuring 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch displays will sport Force Touch technology that will work differently when compared to the Apple Watch, new MacBook and 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro.

 

iPhone 6C

iPhone 6C

 

9to5mac citing Kuo claims that the Force Touch technology on the iPhone 6S will sense “how much of a user’s finger contacts the display.” It will only detect a touch when the user “adequately” touches the screen, thus differentiating it from light tap. The report claims that the upcoming iPhones will feature dedicated sensor, which will be placed under the backlight, to accurately measure touch pressure. Kuo says Samsung uses a similar methodology for touch sensor placement on Galaxy Note phablet screens, though he adds that Apple’s implementation will be more advanced.

Kuo speculates that addition of Force Touch will be a major upgrade from the last year’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus leading him to believe that Apple might call it ‘iPhone 7’.

In the meanwhile, the Force Touch sensors are being tipped to only be made available on the iPhone 6S Plus, with a report out of China (via GSMArena) adding the sensors will costs two and half times as much as that on the Apple Watch due to its larger size.

 

iPhone 6C

An earlier report hinting Apple will launch three iPhones suggested that the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus will be incremental updates from last year’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 6C on the other hand would be the cheaper variant of the handset that the Cupertino-based giant will launch to tap emerging markets, which also includes India. All three were said to launch in the second half of 2015.

Asus ZenFone 2 – The 3 Variants Launched in India

Asus ZenFone 2

Asus at its Thursday event launched the three variants of the ZenFone 2 lineup in India (four including storage variants), priced from Rs. 12,999 to Rs. 22,999. The Taiwanese company, as reported by NDTV Gadgets prior to launch, only made the 5.5-inch screen variants of the smartphone lineup available in India.

The ZenFone 2 variants announced on Thursday are the Asus ZenFone 2 ZE551ML(with 4GB of RAM, 64GB ROM or inbuilt storage, and a 5.5-inch full-HD display) which is the top-end variant of the smartphone series and will be available at Rs. 22,999; the ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (with 4GB of RAM, 32GB ROM, and a 5.5-inch full-HD display) which is identical to the top-end variant but with half the inbuilt storage, priced at Rs. 19,999; the ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (with 2GB of RAM, 16GB ROM, and 5.5-inch full-HD display) at Rs. 14,999, while the basic model of the series is the Asus ZenFone 2 ZE550ML (with 2GB RAM, 16GB ROM and 5.5-inch HD display), priced at Rs. 12,999.

Asus, as it had with the first-generation ZenFone series, has tied up with Flipkart as online retailer of the ZenFone 2 series. All the Asus ZenFone 2 series models are available to pre-order on Flipkart starting Thursday; though the top-end variant of the ZenFone 2 featuring 64GB inbuilt storage and 4GB of RAM is yet not listed on Flipkart. We contacted Asus India and were told the timeline for release has not yet been decided, and more details will be made available shortly.

 

According to the Flipkart listing, the Asus ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (with 4GB of RAM, 32GB ROM, and a 5.5-inch full-HD display) comes with a tentative release date of May 13 while the ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (with 2GB of RAM, 16GB ROM, and 5.5-inch full-HD display) comes with a tentative release date of May 4. The Asus ZenFone 2 ZE550ML (with 2GB RAM, 16GB ROM and 5.5-inch HD display) also comes with a tentative release date of May 4.

 

 

Asus ZenFone 2

Asus ZenFone 2

All variants of the Asus ZenFone 2 run the company’s new ZenUI based on Google’s Android 5.0 Lollipop, and feature Intel Atom SoCs. The Asus ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (4GB RAM) features a 64-bit 2.3GHz quad-core Intel Atom Z3580 processor, while the ZenFone 2 ZE551ML 2GB RAM model features a 1.8GHz quad-core Intel Atom Z3560. The ZenFone 2 ZE550ML is also powered by the same Intel Atom Z3560 chipset. All the versions support expandable storage via microSD card (up to 64GB).

The Asus ZenFone 2 ZE551ML features a 5.5-inch full-HD display in both the 2GB and 4GB RAM variants, while the Asus ZenFone 2 ZE550ML features a 5.5-inch HD display. All the models are dual-SIM (Micro-SIMs) smartphones, and feature 4G connectivity support for Indian LTE bands (Band 3 and Band 40).

The Asus ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (4GB and 2GB RAM models) and the ZenFone 2 ZE550ML sport 13-megapixel rear PixelMaster camera while there is a 5-megapixel front camera on board as well. Both the ZenFone 2 ZE551ML models feature dual-tone flash. A 3000mAh battery backs all four ZenFone 2 ZE551ML (4GB and 2GB RAM models) and the ZenFone 2 ZE550ML smartphones.

Asus on Thursday, apart from launching the new ZenFone 2 series in India, also announced various accessories including the ZenFlash, LolliFlash, View Flip Cover Deluxe, ZenPower, and ZenEar.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review: The Gamble Pays Off

It’s been a tumultuous year for Samsung. Buoyant and complacent with being the world’s most successful Android smartphone vendor for ages, the Korean giant was perhaps not prepared for its Galaxy S5 flagship last year to be so roundly criticised for not breaking any new ground. The heart rate sensor was pretty much mostly a gimmick, and the glossy plastic body did it no favours when seen next to its competition. Chinese brands have started having an impact on its low-end and mid-range sales, and Lollipop updates for older devices have been coming too slowly, if at all.

Samsung’s image has lost a lot of its former sheen; even more so when it comes to the top-end Galaxy S range. Under more pressure than ever before, the company is betting on a major reinvention. Gone is the cheap plastic, in favour of slick aluminium. Gone is the heavy TouchWiz skin with dozens of settings and features that no one ever used – the software is more restrained than ever.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review

It’s been a tumultuous year for Samsung. Buoyant and complacent with being the world’s most successful Android smartphone vendor for ages, the Korean giant was perhaps not prepared for its Galaxy S5 flagship last year to be so roundly criticised for not breaking any new ground. The heart rate sensor was pretty much mostly a gimmick, and the glossy plastic body did it no favours when seen next to its competition. Chinese brands have started having an impact on its low-end and mid-range sales, and Lollipop updates for older devices have been coming too slowly, if at all.Samsung’s image has lost a lot of its former sheen; even more so when it comes to the top-end Galaxy S range. Under more pressure than ever before, the company is betting on a major reinvention. Gone is the cheap plastic, in favour of slick aluminium. Gone is the heavy TouchWiz skin with dozens of settings and features that no one ever used – the software is more restrained than ever.
Samsung Galaxy S6 Review
Samsung Galaxy S6 Review
We first saw the new Samsung Galaxy S6 (and its eclectic curved-glass twin, theGalaxy S6 Edge) shortly after its launch at the 2015 Mobile World Congress show, but now we’ve had enough time to conduct a full, thorough review. The device is launching in India just over a month after its global debut, making it the first of this year’s flagship models to make it here. Should you rush out and buy one?Look and feel

Samsung Galaxy S6 Review

Samsung has been experimenting with metal bodies up and down its product lineup, so it’s no surprise that the new flagship model comes in full aluminium trim. Samsung’s phones have been difficult to tell apart in the past because of the company’s very set template, and the Galaxy S6 feels like something of a missed opportunity in terms of a breakout design. With new materials and new priorities, Samsung could have gone in exciting directions but the Galaxy S6 not only carries forward most of its predecessors’ style, it somehow simultaneously manages to look like it has borrowed cues from Sony and Apple.While the influence of the iPhone 6 (Review | Pictures) and its predecessors is apparent in details such as the machined speaker grille and chamfered rim edges, we find that the overall shape and style feel more derivative of the Sony Xperia Z3 (Review| Pictures). Other touches, such as the silver-rimmed physical Home button are pure Samsung.

Software
Samsung has famously reduced a lot of the software clutter that defined its Galaxy S4 and Galaxy S5 devices. TouchWiz has tried to mimic some of Google’s Lollipop-era Material Design aesthetic and it is a marked improvement over previous Samsung attempts at UI design. Responsiveness isn’t a problem, and we never got the feeling that any of the customisations were a step backwards from stock Android.

There are some things that you might never use, but are fairly unobtrusive and can be disabled, such as the Fliboard-style news reader to the left of the primary home screen, and the ability to run two apps simultaneously in a split-screen mode. The quick settings and notifications shade is handy – for example, grabbing the brightness slider makes all other controls temporarily disappear from the screen, letting you see how your adjustment will affect the underlying app or content.