Tag Archives: digital

Panasonic TX-42AS500

Panasonic TX-42AS500

The most affordable Freetime TV packs in all UK catch-up TV apps

This TV is a step up in Panasonic’s range from the one above, and it’s all about usability. Pictures from all sources are clean, with HD channels and Blu-ray in particular reasonably fluid and with just enough contrast and colour to compete. It’s Freetime that really excites however, the Freesat-centric catch-up TV service that’s not available on the model below. Bringing not only excellent usability, but all key catch-up TV apps for the UK, it complements the excellent My Home Screen user interface, and adds a Netflix app. The TX-42AS600 also plays nicely with digital video, music and photo files.

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Panasonic Viera TX-50AX802B 4K TV

We’ve got been preserving out on reviewing the Panasonic TX-50AX802 4K television for some time. however now that time has come and the AX800 series is more valuable than ever because of the advent of Netflix 4K. That, coupled with constructed-in tuners for Freeview HD and Freesat HD with Freetime, makes it an extremely-high definition television tube with special enchantment.

Additionally it is a 4K set that lands on the correct side of low-cost: it can be a penny shy of £1,500 at final count which, for a dominating 50-inch panel, places it in a an identical ballpark to where high-rated Full HD tellies were just a few years in the past.

in short, there’s little excuse not to embody the approaching extremely-high definition technology. however is the AX802B the excellent 4K tv for the price – or is it bettered by way of its friends?

The Panasonic AX802B would not have a screen that sits flawlessly upright; the top aspect sits slanted further back than the backside part’s function. that’s a design trait identical (however less extreme than) the last-new release of Sony televisions. This subtle screen perspective is well viewed and would not skew the looks of the Panasonic picture though – and we actually prefer it to the Sony design. in case you decide on to wall-mount then this won’t be a factor of be aware, of direction.

Out of the box a hefty beast of a stand links the to the AX802B’s display. This hulk-like field, which is where much of the weight is, is hidden from the entrance-on view, leaving the or else narrow silver-aspect stand with its open aperture design to add a lick of class to the set total.

however, if you are hoping to squeeze the tv practically a wall then this box-like detail of the stand protrudes 180mm to the rear.

The AX802B’s monitor is encased with the aid of a black bezel, which measures simply 7mm, but the total set isn’t the slimmest on the market as the panel part’s edges are 25mm deep. This rather does not matter in a sensible sense given the scope of the stand although.

There’s a casual simplicity to the AX802’s design that we instead like. It does not overcomplicate things and leaves the photograph to dominate the view.
Connections ahoy

With most TVs there aren’t too many distinctive aspects to speak about in terms of ports. however the Panasonic TX-50AX802B is one other beast.

Flip the monitor round and, yep, it has the average HDMI and USB ports – three HDMI usual, a separate fourth for 4K resolution; while USB is catered for by means of a pair of USB 2.zero and a third USB three.zero port – but there is also an SD card slot.

We determined the SD card slot certainly helpful for looking at still pics direct from cameras, although you can also wish to provide media on this means too. As MKV, AVI, MOV, MP4 and WMV are all supported it is convenient to look at nearly all of codecs, whether by way of direct input or utilising a networked attached storage (NAS) drive.

Those are all positives, nevertheless it’s the built-in tuners that stand-out. There are two satellite tv for pc LNB ports, so if you have a satellite dish then which you could plug in and Freesat HD is at your fingertips. No want for a box, no subscription, no nonsense – simply lots of television channels with out the fuss. The set also caters for Freeview HD, however as we shouldn’t have a common aerial mounted that is now not a function we verified.

It additionally entails Freetime, which the digital programme guide (EPG) will present trap-up options for some key channels without needing to dig into additional apps first. it’s kind of like YouView for Freesat, all through a simple tap of the left path button tap on the provided far off control.

Adaptable interface

after we first bought the Panasonic TX-50AX802B it was obsessed with watching us. No, really – and we suggestion it should have been the opposite direction around. there is a rather irksome mode buried in the menus where the on-board camera senses motion and turns the television on seeing that, well, certainly each person, in every single place needs that to occur… no one wherever desires that to occur. it can be effortlessly switched off although.

Apps: stage playing area

there’s a committed Apps button on the far flung manipulate for quick access to the Apps Market, alongside the already established functions equivalent to BBC iPlayer, YouTube and now Netflix on hand in 4K for the primary time on a Panasonic 4K small screen television. we have now checked the update and were gazing Breaking dangerous in 2160p – and it appears wonderful.

in relation to photograph great we’ve been impressed by using something we have now thrown at the Viera TX-50AX802B. From documents directly on USB or via SD card, through to HD channels from Freesat, the entire Full HD content has appeared remarkable upscaled to 4K. the whole lot simply looks so sharp.

If you are looking to leap on board the 4K ultra-excessive definition revolution, then the Panasonic Viera TX-50AX802B is a fine alternative for a 50-inch set. At beneath £1,500 it places the long run to your residing room for a rate that is not going to go away you penniless – in contrast to one of the vital competitors. The addition of built-in Freesat HD with Freetime and Freeview HD tuners add a different bonus without the have got to purchase right into a separate set-top box too.

With a great-sharp photograph and ultimate sound straight out of the box, customisable user interface dwelling screens to dig into these apps and capture-up offerings, and that reasonable cost besides, the Panasonic Viera TX-50AX802B is a 4K television as robust as every other 4K telly available on the market. If you are looking for an low-cost 4K small screen television then this must be a consideration for the very prime of your list.

TX-50AX802B

 

BlackBerry Venice

BlackBerry Venice

BlackBerry is making a new phone so as to run on the Android system, presently codenamed ‘Venice’. BlackBerry has had a rough time within the cell world in latest years, but is it about to make a comeback? read on for what we know to this point concerning the BlackBerry Venice rate, unencumber date, specs, aspects and more.

BlackBerry Venice design

Android Authority just lately bought some hands-on pictures (beneath) of the BlackBerry Venice, which give us a greater look at the interface. It seems to be much like inventory Android, however Android Authority says there are some further BlackBerry thrives, equivalent to keyboard shortcuts for what it calls ‘fast tasks’

We do not know how these will show up themselves, but it would make experience to us if the keyboard had been to function beyond simple persona enter. Android Authority additionally speculates that the rear digicam sensor will are available in at 18 MP (which ties in with earlier rumors), hanging the Venice alongside the top tier of Android flagships in phrases of digital camera specs.

The previous batch of leaked BlackBerry Venice pix from NowhereElse.fr gave us a few more small print in regards to the BlackBerry Venice design. within the below right photo, you will realize a SIM card slot and a microSD slot at the high of the handset, which can enchantment to these disenchanted with the shortage of expandable storage on latest Samsung instruments (such because the Galaxy notice 5).

In the beneath left image, that you can naturally see that the display is curved, and that the rear of the device has a woven, nearly Kevlar outcomes. in addition, the digital camera sensor is accompanied by way of a twin-LED flash.

BlackBerry Venice specs

together with the picture below, cell enviornment claims to have some information on the BlackBerry Venice specs. it will reportedly arrive with a QHD show, three GB of RAM, 18 MP major digital camera and at least a 3,000 mAh battery. phone arena’s supply additionally advised it that, in true BlackBerry tradition, the Venice’s safety would be “2nd to none”.

Different rumors for the BlackBerry Venice propose it’s going to have a 5 MP entrance-dealing with digital camera and a 1.8 GHz Hexa-core Snapdragon 808 processor. The show dimension is claimed to be 5.four inches.

BlackBerry Venice unencumber date

In August, Twitter leaker @evleaks tweeted that the BlackBerry Venice has been “established for November liberate on all 4 most important US carriers”. a couple of days later, renders of the suspected gadget emerged within the form of some neat GIFs. verify them out:

For me, this could be the comeback, revival, underdog, nostalgia story of the yr. Who, in one million years, would ever believe that BlackBerry could have a shot at coming into our first-rate Android phones list? possibly there isn’t a risk, however maybe, just may, it is viable.

Dying Husband Left Her the House and Car, but Forgot the Apple Password

Dying Husband Left Her the House and Car, but Forgot the Apple Password

After Peggy Bush’s husband, David, succumbed to lung cancer last August, she liked to play card games on their iPad to pass the time. The 72-year-old resident of Victoria, Canada, was on an app one day when it suddenly stopped working, and she was unable to reload the device without providing a password for their Apple ID account.

Bush’s husband never told her the password, and she hadn’t thought to ask. Unlike so many of the things David had left for Bush in his will – car ownership, the title of the house, basically everything he owned – this digital asset followed him to the grave.

According to reporting by the Canadian Broadcasting Channel, the journey to procure the password proved more difficult than any other process involved in David’s passing.

“I thought it was ridiculous,” Bush told CBC. “I could get the pensions, I could get benefits, I could get all kinds of things from the federal government and the other government. But from Apple, I couldn’t even get a silly password.”

At first, they thought the solution would be simple. Bush’s daughter, Donna, called Apple to ask about having the password retrieved and the account reset. The company then requested David’s will and death certificate.

When they got these documents together and called a second time, Apple said they had never heard of the case. Donna told CBC that it took several phone calls and two months of waiting for Apple to accept a notarized death certificate, her father’s will and the serial numbers for the iPad and Mac computer to which Bush also wanted access.

But this was not enough. Over the phone, a representative told Donna the next step: “You need a court order.”

“I was just completely flummoxed,” Donna told CBC. “What do you mean a court order?”

Obtaining one could cost thousands of dollars, depending on the need for a lawyer, so Donna decided to take her complaint straight to the top.

“I then wrote a letter to Tim Cook, the head of Apple, saying this is ridiculous,” she said. “All I want to do is download a card game for my mother on the iPad. I don’t want to have to go to court to do that, and I finally got a call from customer relations who confirmed, yes, that is their policy.”

While Bush had the option of setting up a new Apple ID account, that would have meant losing all the app purchases that she and her husband had made on the original one.

Bush ended up buying a new laptop (not a Mac). Her mission to gain access to her husband’s Apple ID seemed futile until CBC’s “Go Public” wing contacted the company on Bush’s behalf.

Apple apologized for the “misunderstanding” and has since started working with Bush to solve the issue without a court order, CBC reported this week.

For the Bushes, the overdue response feels like putting a Band-Aid on a larger problem.

“We certainly don’t want other people to have to go through the hassle that we’ve gone through,” Donna told CBC. “We’d really like Apple to develop a policy that is far more understanding of what people go through, especially at this very difficult time in our family’s life, having just lost my dad.”

Toronto estate lawyer Daniel Nelson told CBC that online access is controlled by service providers such as Apple, even if users own their digital material. He described the court order demand as “heavy-handed,” but also said Canadian digital property laws are “murky.”

While the incident occurred in Canada, Americans have encountered similar snafus involving the digital assets of deceased relatives on this side of the border.

In 2011, after 15-year-old Eric Rash of Virginia committed suicide, his parents desperately wanted to know why. But when they tried looking to his Facebook page for answers, the website cited state and federal privacy laws blocking their access.

“We were just grieving parents reaching out for anything we could,” Rash’s father, Ricky, told The Washington Post in 2013.

The question of whether digital assets should be treated the same as material possessions where inheritance is concerned has emerged naturally with the growing ubiquity of social media usage, but few concrete answers have been offered by lawmakers and legal authorities. Most states place digital and physical property in different categories, and tech companies themselves prohibit password-sharing. This means that often a person’s virtual trail continues to float in cyberspace following their death, adding to the grief felt by surviving family.

That, however, is slowly changing.

Thanks to a bill passed two years ago, Virginia is now among a handful of other states that have enacted legislation addressing the inheritance of email, blogs and other social media. More recently, Delaware passed a law in 2014 that gives family members and other heirs complete control over an individual’s digital accounts after their passing. And nearly a year ago, Facebook rolled out new settings that allow users to manage how their account will appear to the public and whether they want to pass it onto someone else in the event of their deaths.

“It’s big. It’s real big,” attorney Deborah Matthews told The Post in August 2014, after the Delaware legislation was announced. “I ask my clients the same thing I ask them about their safe deposit boxes: Who has access? Who has a key?”

© 2016 The Washington Post


Original Article

‘Dark Net’ Explores the Digital Age’s Toll on Us

'Dark Net' Explores the Digital Age's Toll on Us

The scariness of the digital age has been the peg for a number of newsmagazine segments and docu-series, many of them not going, conceptually, much beyond “Can you believe what some people are using the Internet for these days?” “Dark Net,” an eight-part series that begins Thursday night on Showtime, goes further, using examples of unsettling digital phenomena to ponder larger questions, like whether and how the digital age might be changing us as a species.

The premiere is, of course, about sex, but even this clickbait-ish episode has ambitions. Its segments feature a dominant-submissive couple who conduct their relationship via the Internet and tracking technology; a female victim of an ex-boyfriend, who posted intimate photos of her; and a Japanese man who is in love with an animated character named Rinko. There is a voyeuristic element to this, as there always is when documentarians take up online sex, but there is also a tentative exploration of the possibility that standard ideas about love are headed for a radical expansion.

“Human beings are such selfish creatures,” says Akari Uchida, who helped develop LovePlus, the dating simulator where Rinko lives. “When we are by ourselves, we become very lonely, but we find it annoying when we’re with someone else. We need to add a ‘0.5’ – an extension of ourselves. An extension of ourselves that is not another individual, but an object, a device.”

By the second installment, “Dark Net” really starts to show its determination to be more than you expect. The episode involves biotechnology, and one segment introduces a man in Nashville who has taken the Fitbit fad to the extreme. He uses dozens of types of technology, wearable and otherwise, to monitor practically everything about his body and his life.

And at first, this seems to be a feel-good story: The man was overweight, and examining his personal data helped him to change his behaviors and drop more than 100 pounds. But later we see him on an awkward first date that suggests that his data obsession has affected his ability to interact with actual humans. (His icebreaker is to measure his companion’s heart rate.)

“For me, relationships are difficult,” he admits. “I see people as just a pile of information.” He compares data to heroin: Having it only makes you want more. The same technology that made him physically fit is dehumanizing him.

The third episode, which investigates particularly disturbing territory, also comes with a twist. Technology, especially the dark net, enables child pornographers, but technology also is being used to catch pedophiles and perhaps even treat them. Would using avatars of children to satisfy pedophilic desires be a legitimate or ethical remedy? If that question troubles you, don’t watch “Dark Net.”

In general, the program successfully walks a fine line between glorifying technology and treating it as a curiosity. No one knows where all this is headed, but “Dark Net” is at least peering into the possible futures with more sophistication than most.

© 2016 New York Times News Service

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Original Article