Tag Archives: cameras

Canon 7DmarkII revelada na Photokina

Canon 7DmarkII

It’s been five years since Canon first introduced its universally lauded 7D camera, which continues to be among the best choices for professionally minded photographers and VideoVigilancia alike. Time waits for no DSLR, however, and now the first image of a purported 7D Mark II has emerged out of Japan alongside a set of specs. At the heart of the camera is an upgraded 20-megapixel CMOS sensor, which is combined with a new 65-point autofocus system and dual DIGIC 6 image processors. It’ll be the quality of that new sensor, rather than any of the numbers surrounding it, that will decide whether this Mark II model lives up to and extends the legacy of the original. Looking at the weather-sealed exterior of the new camera gives little hint of the changes within. It seems to have been left pretty much unchanged.

This new launch appears to be timed to coincide with the big Photokina show coming up in Germany next week. Taking place every two years, Photokina is an event that camera makers anticipate months in advance, and it stands to reason that Canon would use it to update one of its best-loved cameras. This year’s gathering will likely be much richer on high-quality mirrorless cameras than in the past, and Canon’s more pressing concern may well be to figure out a proper response to the excellent new compact shooters from the likes of Fujifilm and Sony.

Canon 7DmarkII

Apple iPad 2: The emperor’s successor

Apple iPad 2: The emperor's successor

Introduction:
The first iPad was a revolutionary product. There were naysayers galore, nobody was even sure it would work – neither a laptop nor a netbook, and there was no keyboard. Xxx years later, the iPad has sent the competition scrambling to produce tablets of their own.
So is there a tablet better than the iPad? Yes there is. The iPad 2.
These are interesting circumstances for a new version of the device. It’s only competition is the first version of itself, which was so pathbreaking a device that it’s a very tough act to follow.
With iPad 2, Apple has done what it does best with follow-up acts – they’ve kept it simple. Users complained that version 1 was too heavy for prolonged use, and carped about the lack of cameras. Version 2 is 30 per cent slimmer, 15 per cent lighter, and has two cameras. Under the hood, there is a new dual-core A5 chip, to make iPad 2 run a bit faster. As a bonus, there is a nifty smart cover. Lets take an in-depth look.


Hardware
The iPad 2 scores full marks on the way it looks. The square edges of the first iPad have given way to an absolutely thin edge which curves a bit to the back, very similar to the first iPhone.
The whole design of the iPad 2 makes it look slimmer than it actually is. But, even at its thickest, it is just about a third of an inch thick – a hair-breadth thicker than a pencil.
Among the most important additions to the iPad 2 are the cameras. On the front, the camera is housed in the middle of the top bezel and on the back it is housed on the top right corner. More about the cameras below.
The other connections and buttons remain the same as they were on the previous iPad. These include a sleep/wake button on the top right, a headphone jack on the top left, silent/screen lock rotation on the right, housed next to the volume rocker and the 30-pinApple connector at the bottom edge.
iPad 2 is available in both black and white.


Cameras
Welcome addition though it be, this is one upgrade that Apple could have done better. The cameras are barely adequate for a path-breaking device like the iPad. They probably use the same sensors as the iPod touch.
The front camera is a VGA and the rear camera is about a megapixel as it can shoot HDvideo in 720p. The cameras are adequate for occasional video, but are best avoided for taking photos.
But the one thing they work particularly well for? Facetime, Apple’s version of video chat. The iPad’s big screen coupled with the two in-built cameras make video chat a very special experience on the iPad 2. The only catch is that Facetime does not work on 3G and requires a Wi-Fi network.
Gaming and multimedia
Apple has introduced their latest A5 processor in the iPad 2. The dual-core powerhouse promises to make the tablet twice as fast as the previous version and multiplies its graphics performance by nine times.
The difference really pops while gaming on the new iPad. The visuals are detailed and crisper. The difference is pronounced enough for games like Infinity Blade and FIFA to launch updated versions optimised for the iPad 2. Even Angry Birds Rio seemed to work faster on the iPad 2 than the original iPad. There is also a separate section in the app store that caters to games optimised for the iPad 2.
Videos and music are not very different from the original iPad and are of the same top-notch quality. Better in-built speakers would have helped. iPad 3, maybe?


Apps
With the new iPad, Apple also launched some new applications – the Photo Booth, Garage Band and iMovie. While Garage Band will even make novice musicians sound like maestros, iMovie tries to make movie editing on the move easier. iMovie in particular makes use of the faster processor in the new iPad to quickly edit movies, apply cool transitions and include snazzy sound effects. But, you might face a problem while importing video to edit. You will either need to shoot the video using iPad’s in-built cameras or import them using the SD card adapter while ensuring that they have been shot in a format that the iPad can play with.
Photo Booth remains a lot of fun in its iPad avatar too. It will entertain children for hours and possibly get the adults interested for a while. With 9 different live previews at one time, it really shows how the iPad’s graphics prowess has increased.


Smart Cover
A key innovation to the new iPad is the Smart Cover. Unlike other cases, the Smart Cover is more like a screen protector that is, well, smartly built. It not only protects the screen, it helps to clean it too and wakes up the iPad as it is opened.
The way it connects to the iPad is also quite unique, by using magnets. It will take you all of 3 seconds to attach the smart cover to the iPad. The ribbed construction also allows you to fold it into ways that makes the iPad easy to hold and prop-up on the desk.
However, it’s not all good – the Smart Cover does come with a set of problems. It does not cover the back of the iPad, so you will end up scratching the shiny aluminium back sooner than you think. The ribbed construction causes ugly dirt lines on the iPad screen if you do not clean the screen regularly. Despite these minus points, it is, beyond doubt, the smartest iPad cover till date. So much so, some people wanted to buy the iPad just for the cover.


Verdict
Bottomline: is it faster and thinner? It is. But, as we said straight off, the original iPad is a tough act to follow. It doesn’t warrant an immediate upgrade, even though the iPad 2 is a worthy successor. If you have the original iPad, you may want to hold on to it, unless you want to video chat.
If you do not have a tablet and are thinking of buying one, the iPad 2 is a nobrainer. With thousands of apps and no serious competitor, it is your best available choice.

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Original Article here

Micromax Canvas Tab P690 Review: Only for Entertainment

Micromax Canvas Tab P690 Review: Only for Entertainment

Low-cost Android tablets are fairly common, but with 5-inch and 5.5-inch smartphones becoming increasingly common, the case for having yet another device in your life has become somewhat less clear. Devices like this are great for reading and browsing the Web on if you have one lying around, but chances are if you have a smartphone, tablet and laptop, the tablet is the most likely to be left behind.

Micromax has a new offering, the Canvas Tab P690, which is trying to find a space in users’ lives. It has an 8-inch screen and offers cellular voice calling for those who might use such a feature. The cost is low enough to be tempting, and the company advertises loads of freebies in the form of physical accessories as well as software. Let’s see what you might have to gain by owning one of these.

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Look and feel
The Canvas Tab P690 looks rather nice at first glance. It isn’t all that slim but it does have bold, distinctive lines including chiselled edges around the rear. The front is plain black apart from the silver earpiece, and there are no markings thanks to the use of on-screen buttons that rotate with the device so you can hold it any way. The sides and back have a thin metal outer layer with a very striking brushed pattern. The panel doesn’t appear to be removable, which means the battery is sealed inside.

The earpiece on the front suggests that this tablet is to be held upright, but the logos and regulatory text on the rear are all printed as if landscape is the ideal orientation. Held this way, there’s a large Intel logo in the lower left corner and a matching Micromax logo in the lower right. Another Canvas Tab logo is printed right in the middle for good measure, and there’s a sticker with a barcode and SAR information right beneath it – though slightly crooked on our review unit.

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The Micro-USB charging and data port is on top, right next to the 3.5mm audio socket. Across from these two, you’ll find a small speaker grille. The power and volume buttons are just around the corner on the upper right. Beneath them, there are the slots for a Micro-SIM and a microSD card. Micromax could have left the microSD card exposed for easy access, but instead chose to protect it with the SIM tray. This is a nice touch, but it does mean you’ll have to eject the SIM if ever you want to swap microSD cards.

The left is entirely blank and there’s only a tiny dot on the bottom for the mic. The rear camera is in one corner, with no flash or secondary mic nearby. Grip is not too bad, though we would have preferred a more natural contour to fit in the hand. The Canvas Tab P690 is easy to use as a tablet, but as with all devices of its kind, it’s obviously not the most comfortable when held up to the ear like a phone.

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Micromax supplies a fair number of accessories in the Canvas Tab P690’s distinctive wedge-shaped box. In addition to the standard USB cable and a 2000mAh charger, there’s a USB OTG adapter, a basic headset, an adhesive screen protector and a microfiber cleaning cloth. There are also coupons for several freebies.

Micromax also bundles a flip cover which it claims is worth Rs. 1,500, but the one we got was so ugly and crudely fashioned that we’d rather forget about it. It attaches to the tablet with – yes, seriously – a strip of double-sided tape. We don’t think it will stay attached for long, and you obviously won’t be able to attach and detach it at will. It’s meant to fold up to act as a stand, much like Apple’s iPad smart cover, but does a terrible job of it. We were better served leaning the tablet against the box it came in.

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Specifications and software
The 8-inch 800×1280-pixel screen is fairly commonplace as far as low-cost Android tablets go, but it’s still far too big for any device that you’d ever want to hold up to your ear. If calling is important to you, you’re better off with a much smaller screen. As far as quality goes, this display definitely falls within budget territory. It’s decent enough for casual Web browsing and watching videos, but not really for reading text. Colours are a bit dull and the tablet definitely suffers in daylight.

Intel’s familiar Atom Z3735G processor makes another appearance here. With four cores running at up to 1.83GHz plus basic Intel HD integrated graphics, it’s enough for most common tasks. There’s 1GB of RAM and 8GB of storage space, though interestingly Windows reports only 3.8GB when it’s plugged in, and barely half of that is free at the outset. You’ll need a microSD card, but capacities of only up to 32GB are supported.

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You do get USB-OTG along with Wi-Fi b/g/n, Bluetooth, and 3G data. The battery comes in at a fairly hefty 4000mAh. There’s a 5-megapixel rear camera and a secondary 2-megapixel unit in front. Video recording is limited to 720p on both.

Micromax ships the Canvas Tab with Android 4.4.4 for some reason, though it claims the device is “upgradable to Lollipop”, there’s no indication of when an update will be released and if there’ll be any support beyond that. There’s a tiled news feed to the left of the first homescreen, much like HTC’s BlinkFeed, though it doesn’t seem to be customisable at all and the content isn’t even local.

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It seems to be common for this company to load tons of unnecessary bloatware onto its Android devices and this one is no exception. We counted 20 preloaded apps, not all of which are useful. There’s WPS Office and SwiftKey, but also Saavn, Newshunt, Facebook Messenger, HelloTV, Clean Master and two Angry Birds games. There’s also Micromax’s MAd TV app which lets you claim rewards for watching ads.

Micromax offers over Rs. 3,000 worth of freebies which can be claimed through apps, including a few free Kindle books, a three-month Saavn Pro subscription, extra data on Vodafone connections, in-app currency for Angry Birds, six months of Truecaller Premium, and a few others.

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As with many Android tablets, apps seem to believe they’re running on phones and so appear awkwardly stretched out unless they’re specifically optimised. Another annoyance is that Micromax has tweaked the interface so that there’s a Screenshot button on screen along with the standard Android trio of Home, Back and Recents, pushing them off-centre.

Performance
We weren’t expecting very much considering the Micromax Canvas Tab P690’s relatively weak specifications and the first impressions we had of its screen and hardware. While not exactly bottom-of-the-barrel, it does seem as though more of this device’s budget has gone into its looks than its hardware. That said, we found it easy to navigate, and touch was pretty responsive. Apps did take quite a while to load, and interestingly, the rear of the tablet started to heat up as soon as we launched some games. Over longer sessions playing games and videos, there was noticeable heat buildup.

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Calls were awkward without a headset, but not impossible. We’d really advise using a SIM card only for 3G data and the occasional emergency phone call. This should never be your primary smartphone. The sole built-in speaker was pretty awful for music and movies but we didn’t perceive any playback problems even with heavily encoded 1080p clips.

The tablet managed scores of 31,588 in AnTuTu and 15,954 in Quadrant. Graphics scores were pretty good, with 3DMark Ice Storm Extreme delivering 7,190 points and GFXbench running at 23fps. These are definitely not the strongest scores we’ve seen overall, but they’re pretty solid taking the Canvas Tab P690’s price into consideration. Battery life came in at 5 hours, 51 minutes in our video loop test.

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The cameras, as expected, were pretty awful. There’s really no situation in which we would recommend using this tablet as a primary camera. It’s slow to lock focus and there’s massive shutter lag. The app has zero options apart from a grid overlay to help you frame shots. Photos came out looking severely compressed, with poor rendering of details and textures even in favourable lighting conditions. The less said about this tablet’s cameras, the better.

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Verdict
The Micromax Canvas Tab P690 isn’t a bad little Android tablet at all, but the company will have trouble convincing people they need such a device. Tablets can be useful and fun, but they’re definitely extraneous at this point if you already have a decent enough smartphone. Buy this tablet if you need something to kill time with while commuting, or for children to play with. 3G data access is a huge benefit and you also get voice capabilities for whatever that’s worth.

Micromax has created a good-looking product that has definite strengths and weaknesses. Use it just for entertainment and you’ll be fine.

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Micromax Canvas Tab P690

Micromax Canvas Tab P690

R 8999 3.0

  • Review
  • Key Specs
  • News
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Affordable 3G tablet
  • Reasonable performance
  • Looks good
  • Bad
  • Poor battery life
  • Weak cameras
  • Very limited storage space

Read detailed Micromax Canvas Tab P690 review

Display

8.00-inch

Processor

1.3GHz

Front Camera

2-megapixel

Resolution

1280×800 pixels

RAM

1GB

OS

Android 4.4.4

Storage

8GB

Rear Camera

5-megapixel

Battery capacity

4000mAh See full Micromax Canvas Tab P690 specifications

  • Micromax Canvas Tab P690 Review: Only for Entertainment
  • Micromax Canvas Tab P690 With 3G Support, 8-Inch Display Launched at Rs. 8,999

Original Article

Micromax Canvas 5 First Impressions

Micromax Canvas 5 First Impressions

As expected, Micromax on Wednesday took the wraps off its much-awaited “Canvas flagship” smartphone, the Canvas 5. The company has this time priced its premium new smartphone at Rs. 11,999, which is interestingly Rs. 6,000 less than the price its predecessor, the Canvas 4, was launched at. Buyers will also receive free double data on 4G for six months from Airtel on the purchase of the handset.

Arriving more than two years after the launch of its predecessor in 2013, the Canvas 5 is a definite upgrade. However, the specifications are not that ground-breaking by today’s standards. The device is likely to appeal to media users more than power users, or those who wish for a superior smartphone camera at this budget level.

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The Canvas 5 has its own pros and cons in each department, most of which we will discuss here. The 4G LTE-enabled Micromax Canvas 5 sports a 5.2-inch display. Above the screen, you have a speaker grille along with the front-facing camera on one side and the front-facing flash on the other. The volume buttons and the power button sit on the right side of the handset, while the headphone jack and the micro-USB port are placed the at top and bottom respectively. In our short time with the Slate Gray version of this phone, we found the volume and power buttons a bit uncomfortable to use as they are stiff and don’t have much travel. We found ourselves looking at the display each time to confirm if the phone was locked or not.

The Canvas 5 has a removable textured plastic rear panel, which gives a good grip but doesn’t feel premium in hand. It hides the two Micro-SIM slots and the MicroSD card slot. The 2900mAh battery however, stays in place and is non-removable.

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The Micromax Canvas 5 runs near-stock Android 5.1 Lollipop out-of-the-box with minor changes to the native apps and interface, none of which should be a problem for most users. The lack of a custom UI skin on top of Android makes the handset interface clean and bloat-free. The company has also promised to bring out an Android 6.0 Marshmallow update for this phone.

As compared to the 5-inch HD (720×1280 pixels) resolution display of the Canvas 4, the Canvas 5 has a slightly larger 5.2-inch full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) display with a 2.5D curve and Gorilla Glass 3 coating. The display is crisp and bright and we were able to reach most parts of it with one thumb without changing our hand position. Typing with one hand is also possible. Since the screen delivers a pixel density of 423ppi, it was crisp even when looked at from different angles. Smart Wake gestures worked just about right.

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Firing up several apps and switching between them was lag-free and quick. However, there was some stuttering in minor tasks such as changing the homepage scrolling effect. Under the hood, the Canvas 5 features an octa-core Mediatek MT6753 processor clocked at 1.3GHz with integrated Mali-T720 MP2 graphics, clubbed with 3GB of DDR3 RAM. Out of 3GB RAM, we noted around 1.8GB free, while the system and the pre-loaded apps used the rest. Our review unit had 16GB of inbuilt storage, of which roughly 9.5GB was available to use. However, this shouldn’t be an issue as you have the option to add up to 32GB of space using a microSD card.

The Micromax Canvas 5 features a 13-megapixel rear camera with LED flash and a 5-megapixel front-facing camera; common features for smartphones nowadays. While the cameras managed to capture decent images in daylight, they failed to impress us when used in a low-light environment. The camera not only relied on high ISO levels but sometimes even struggled to focus a subject for almost 2 seconds after pressing the shutter button before the shot was actually captured. HDR mode also took a couple of seconds to capture and process shots. While the colours were not that accurate in daylight images, the Canvas 5’s camera is likely to satisfy most users at this price level.

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A feature called ‘Zero Shutter Delay’ can be used to lock focus on subjects and take photos without wasting much time. However, there was a minor downgrade in image quality, which the majority of the users might not notice. The feature is deactivated by default. Other modes included are Panorama, Night, Professional, Dual View, Face Beauty and Sports. The interface is like that of many other handsets we’ve seen. The screen has controls for all the modes including the flash and front-facing camera on one side, while the video mode, shutter button and a shortcut to gallery are on the other. The front-facing 5-megapixel camera was satisfying except it has fewer available modes and settings. The Canvas 5 can capture videos in HD resolution at the most.

We were not able to test the life of the Micromax Canvas 5’s 2900mAh battery during our limited time with it, but we will do so when we get our hands on a sample to conduct our full review.

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The successor to the Micromax Canvas 4 seems like a fair deal at Rs. 11,999. However, it will be competing against some of the most popular devices in market, including the Moto G (Gen 3), Xiaomi Mi 4i, and Samsung Galaxy J5. Our initial impression of the Canvas 5 is a mix of both good and bad. On one hand you have the near-stock Android experience, octa-core processor and 3GB of RAM to handle multi-tasking, but on the other the camera is not up to the mark and the build is not very impressive either. So should you buy this phone? We will reserve that decision until the review is out. Stay tuned.

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Micromax Canvas 5

Micromax Canvas 5

R 11999 3.5

  • Review
  • Key Specs
  • News
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Crisp full-HD display
  • Captures detailed close-ups
  • Good overall performance
  • Bad
  • Weak low-light camera performance
  • Battery life could have been better
  • Takes a long time to charge fully

Read detailed Micromax Canvas 5 review

Display

5.20-inch

Processor

1.3GHz

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

1080×1920 pixels

RAM

3GB

OS

Android 5.1

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

13-megapixel

Battery capacity

2900mAh See full Micromax Canvas 5 specifications

  • Micromax Canvas 5 Review
  • Micromax Canvas 5 First Impressions
  • Micromax Canvas 5 With 4G Support, 5.2-Inch Display Launched at Rs. 11,999

More Micromax mobilesOriginal NDTV Gadgets

Canon 760D (Rebel T6s)

Canon 760D

 

In a move that runs the danger of confusing the market, Canon has introduced 2 upgrades to the Greek deity 700D (EOS Rebel T5i); the 750D and also the 760D (reviewed here). just like the 700D, the 750D and 760D square measure DSLRs in Canon’s ‘beginners’ vary. The 760D is at the highest of the cluster, however below the Canon 70D, that sits at very cheap of the ‘enthusiast-level’ vary.

Known as the Rebel T6s in U.S. territories, the 760D includes aterribly similar specification to the 750D at the side ofa number ofadditionaloptions that impact upon its handling, creating it a lot ofappropriatefor knowledgeable photographers or those wanting flex their artistic muscles.Inside the 760D is that the same twenty four.2-million-effective-pixel CMOS sensing element and Digic vi processor found in each the 750D and also theEosM3. this implies that it conjointly has an equivalent Hybrid CMOS AF III optical device system, which mixessection detection and distinction detection, to be usedonceexploitation Live read mode to compose pictures and video on the most screen on the rear of the camera.In a littlehoweverimportantdistinction from the 750D, the 760 includes a Servo optical devicepossibility in Live read and video mode. oncethis can behand-picked the camera continues to focus the lens for as long because the shutter unleash is depressed half-way. each cameras have a continual AF possibilitywithin the Live read section of the most menu. this can be designed to be used in video mode and to pre-focus once shooting stills as, once activated, focus is adjusted fairly slowly once the shutter unleashis notironed.There’s a nineteen cross-type purposeoptical device system on the marketto be usedonce composing pictureswithin theview finder. oncethis method is in use the camera willchoosethe acceptablepurpose to use mechanically in nineteenpurpose AF mode, or it ishand-picked manually in Zone AF or Single purpose AF mode. There arfive zones on the market for choice in Zone AF mode.When Zone AF mode is ready in Continuous optical device (C-AF) mode, the camera switches mechanically between the AF points at intervalsthe chosen zone. In 19-point C-AF mode the camera follows the topicround the frame, switch between AF points.

Canon 760D

Exposure metering additionally changes relying upon whether or not pictures area unit captured victimisation the view finder or the most screen for composition. In reflex mode (when the view finder is used), the seven60D uses Canon’s new 7,560-pixel RGB and InfraRed metering sensing element. though the seven,560 pixels area unit classified into sixty three segments, they every have their own RGB-IR filter and area unit scan severally, that ought to build the system additional correct than the 700D’s. there is still a weight applied to the brightness of the topic underneath the active AF purpose, however it ought to be higher able to assess the scene as a full and provides a balanced exposure.Like the 750D, the 760D has Wi-Fi property in addition as NFC (Near Field Communication) technology for connecting the camera to a smartphone or pill for device and image sharing. The camera also can be connected to Canon’s Connect Station CS100 for image storage.
Sensitive issue?A few cameras within the USA are found with marks on the sensing element that cannot be cleansed off. Canon USA has issued associate degree consultive notice that states that cameras with serial numbers that begin with 01 or 02 could also be affected. However, cameras and coberturas with those numbers that even have a mark on the within of the battery cowl don’t seem to be affected. Canon can examine probably affected cameras and repair them without charge. Neither the 750D nor the 760D that we have a tendency to used for our tests were affected.